MATERIALISM
PICTORIALISM
SURREALISM
AESTHETICAL
SEMIOTICAL
SYMBOLISM
EXPRESSIONISM
MINIMALISM
FORMALISM
INSTALLATION
MEXICAN MURALISM
AUTODESTRUCTIVE ART
AUTOMATISM
TRANSGRESSIVE ART
DAVID ROMO IS A MEXICAN-AMERICAN ARTIST BASED IN NEW YORK
ROMO WAS BORN IN THE U.S. AND RAISED IN MEXICO. HE INITIATED HIS PRACTICE AS A SELF-TAUGHT DRAWER AT THE AGE OF 12 AND DEVELOPED AN INTEREST IN SURREALIST OIL PAINTING. HE MOVED TO NEW YORK IN 2014, AND HE WILL RECEIVE A BFA FROM PARSONS SCHOOL OF ART, MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY IN 2019. 
CONCERNED WITH FORMALISM AND USING SUBJECTIVE INDIVIDUAL EXPERIENCE AS STARTING POINT, ROMO'S WORK OFTEN EXIST IN VARIOUS MEDIUMS TO INVESTIGATE A SINGLE THEME THROUGH A PROCESS OF RESEARCH AND EXPERIMENTATION. THESE EXAMINATIONS RESULT IN PROJECTS DRIVEN BY IDEAS FROM EXISTENCE AND MEMORY TO MATERIALISM AND THE EPHEMERAL.
 
 
His process and materials are perpetually changing, perhaps as a result of his lifelong aversion to the idea of “style” and “personal expression.” Though Haacke is commonly considered a conceptual artist, he fails to see his own work that way—instead, he thinks of his practice as one that does not deal in objects but intellectual provocation.
 
minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist
Working with what he called “planks,” John McCracken created Minimalist sculptures that bridge the material world with the metaphysical. By leaning the planks against the wall, McCracken’s intention was to connect the spheres of two-dimensional painting and three-dimensional sculpture. His method involved a laborious process of painting, sanding, and polishing the polyester resin on each plywood board to achieve a flawless patina that looks machine-made, bringing to mind the 1960s West Coast “Finish Fetish Art” aesthetic. The most dramatic effect of his glossy surfaces is the way they become as reflective as mirrors and oftentimes seem to disappear altogether, such as in his 1985 work Akitanai. “My tendency,” McCracken once said, “is to reduce or develop everything to 'single things'—things which refer to nothing outside [themselves] but which at the same time possibly refer, or relate, to everything.”